People collect all sorts of things — cars, books, records, and of course postage stamps.

I once knew a bloke who had a whole room in his home full of Matchbox cars.

They’ve even started collecting electronic stamps, as opposed to the real ones — that don’t physically exist.

In fact, a couple of years ago Lamborghini launched the first of a series of what it describes as “bitstamps” to commemorate the launch of its Huracan.

A total 20,000 of the little suckers were issued, each a “single” digital object, with a history and uniqueness that is guaranteed by hi-tech Blockchain technology.

It’s the same technology that underpins the cryptocurrency Bitcoin and is used to record financial transactions.

Fast forward and Lloyds is currently auctioning a batch of electronic artwork, based on the same blockchain technology — this time in the form a digital version of the iconic 1971 Ford Falcon GTHO Phase III.

In fact, they have almost 50 of these digital cars up for grabs and someone has bid as much as $6300 for one of them, Lot 2 — a black one.

Lloyds said this particular NFT (Non-Fungible Token), that’s how they refer to them, is a rare and collectable and has huge benefits.

It can be displayed on any screen you want.

The first buyer of this model will receive 10 per cent of any future sale

They will also receive a framed picture of the NFT, for those of you who just need to be able to hold something in your hands to know its real.

GTHO
The digital 1971 Ford Falcon GTHO Phase III finished in Onyx Black with sunroof.

 

Car buffs will know that only 300 Ford Falcon GTHO Phase III models were built and just one of them left the factory painted black.

The one-of-one NFT Ford Falcon GTHO Phase III is in Onyx Black with matching black interior, sunroof and all extras it was originally sold with.

Specifications have been verified by ICAARS — Australia’s leading Classic Car verification company — as being the correct representation of the physical car sold in 1971.

Chief Operating Officer Lee Hames said this is a world first for an auction house and LLoyds is very excited to be taking lead on this trending technology.

“We really see the prosperous future in Blockchain technology and expect it to have a massive impact on art, cars and also supply chain management,” he said.

The NFT GTHO comes with a boot full of benefits:

  • The very first buyer of this model will receive 10 per cent of every future sale of this digital NFT classic car on Lloyds NFT Auctions. (Imagine buying the original car in 1971 and getting 10 per cent of every sale every time it was resold until today)
  • 2 years of Free Buyer’s Premium or Commission at Lloyds Auctions on any products purchased by you personally or by a company you are an owner of – this could be worth hundreds of thousands in the right hands (fair use policy applies).
  • The current owner of the identical physical vehicle will receive 10 per cent of the hammer price as well. Current owner must be confidentially registered via with Lloyds Auctions Owners Register before the hammer drops on the NFT version (email owner@lloydsauctions.com.au)
  • Unique high resolution 3D model of this vehicle
  • One complimentary ICAARS.com desktop verification for any real classic car
  • You will also receive 100,000 Lloyds – “Webber” tokens that can be used for heaps of bonuses experiences and one-off events.

If the idea of owning a digital version of the car lacks appeal (even if it can be displayed at any time on any device), Lloyds also has the real thing up for auction.

On offer is an original 1971 Ford Falcon GTHO Phase III finished in Yellow Glo — one of 12 ever built.  

The bad news is that it is expected to achieve anywhere between $1.5 and $2 million dollars when it goes under the hammer.

You can view the entire collection of the Ford Falcon NFT’s here or visit www.lloydsauctions.com.au for more information.

Auction ends September 25, at 8.00pm (AEST).

 

CHECKOUT: NZ calls and so does Fredd’s big garage sale

CHECKOUT: Vote for the Falcon GT you’d like to own

Chance to own digital GTHO

Riley

Chris Riley has been a journalist for almost 40 years. He has spent half of his career as a writer, editor and production editor in newspapers, the rest of the time driving and writing about cars both in print and online. His love affair with cars began as a teenager with the purchase of an old VW Beetle, followed by another Beetle and a string of other cars on which he has wasted too much time and money. A self-confessed geek, he’s not afraid to ask the hard questions - at the risk of sounding silly.
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