Looking for a way to beat cabin fever?

Audi is offering enthusiasts the chance to take a guided tour of its production plant at Ingolstadt, Germany — all from the safety of your home.

AudiStream is a ground-breaking, online interactive tour of the largest Audi factory in the world, equivalent in size to the principality of Monaco — with its very own ‘Ingolstadt Audi’ train station.

Audi has been building cars at the colossal site for more than 70 years.

In 2019 alone, it produced more than 441,608 vehicles and has used only green electricity from 2012.

Reducing the worldwide ecological footprint is a great priority for Audi, which aims to achieve CO2-neutral production locations by 2025.

READ:  Catch your breath in the R8

Now with AudiStream, the site can be viewed in as little as 15 minutes from anywhere in the world.

All you need is a laptop or mobile internet-enabled device, and you can access AudiStream free of charge.

Audi is the first car manufacturer to offer such an initiative.

Fans of the four rings will experience the A3 bodyshop and the A4 assembly line, all from a safe and virtual distance.

They will see how 2300 cars are produced daily by 45,000 workers, moving through every part of the process, right up to the point when the engines are switched on for the very first time.

And, along the way, visitors will learn all the technical and technological detail behind the famous Audi Vorsprung durch Technik philosophy, thanks to an experienced tour guide who can answer all those burning questions over a live interactive discussion or online chat.

To book a 20-minute time slot for the Audi factory tour, simply go to www.audi.stream

You can also download a video of the AudiStream here.

AudiStream
Take the tour of Audi’s Ingolstadt factory from the safety of isolation.

CHECKOUT: Green Hell? Swansong for Audi’s hard-charging V10

CHECKOUT: Porsche magic turned Benz and Audis into bahnstormers

Now's the time to take the Audi tour

Riley

Chris Riley has been a journalist for 40 years. He has spent half of his career as a writer, editor and production editor in newspapers, the rest of the time driving and writing about cars both in print and online. His love affair with cars began as a teenager with the purchase of an old VW Beetle, followed by another Beetle and a string of other cars on which he has wasted too much time and money. A self-confessed geek, he’s not afraid to ask the hard questions - at the risk of sounding silly.
0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments