Lexus is claiming some impressive stats for its latest electrified concept.

Range from a single charge is 600km while the Lexus LF-Z Electrified can blast from 0-100km/h in 3.0 seconds flat on its way to 200km/h.

Based on a dedicated Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) platform, LF-Z features a new four-wheel drive system called DIRECT4 that channels the  instant torque from the electric motors to control each wheel individually, providing a superior and highly flexible driving experience.

With the fusion of electric technology and vehicle motion control, Lexus says the aim is to produce performance in a way that better connects a driver with vehicle.

Drawing from advanced lithium-ion battery technology, LF-Z develops 400kW of power and 700Nm of torque.

The large, long wheelbase, four-door coupe cum SUV achieves an ideal balance and inertia by optimally positioning the battery and motors.

The 90kWh lithium-ion battery pack is mounted lengthways under the floor, making the chassis more rigid and the centre of gravity lower for better handling.

In addition, this design helps to reduce noise and vibrations from entering the cabin.

DIRECT4 allows power from the high-torque motors to be controlled individually, enabling the vehicle’s posture to be finely controlled according to human senses and inputs.

READ:  Avast, ye landlubbers -- if it's treasure y' seek'n

In addition, by controlling the front and rear drive wheels independently, the system can provide the appropriate application of drive, either to front wheels, rear wheels or all wheels — depending on the situation.

The system controls the distribution of driving force through the seamless orchestration and calculation of accelerator pedal application and steering wheel operation, resulting in powerful acceleration and exhilarating cornering performance.

The use of steer-by-wire eliminates the need for a mechanical connection through the steering shaft, enabling the vehicle to turn with a reduced steering angle and greater precision in response to driving conditions.

A sculpted exterior accentuates the uniqueness of Lexus design and expresses the dynamic and agile driving sensation delivered by high-output electric motors.

To provide a ‘uniquely BEV’ driving experience, the interior is equipped with a Tazuna cockpit with an open and minimalist design.

Through dialogue with the driver and based on learned driver preferences and behavioural traits, Artificial Intelligence (AI) acts as a lifestyle concierge, proposing routes and making restaurant reservations, among others.

A panoramic sunroof with electrochromic glass is equipped with entertainment functions such as dimming for privacy and shade, or illumination to reflect the passing night sky.

In the centre of the roof is a touch panel that connects the front and rear seats and is used for communication between passengers.

The reclining rear seats are equipped with a massage function, bringing a soothing and peaceful time to all passengers when traveling.

 

CHECKOUT: Big Lexus back for more

CHECKOUT: Lexus adds to the electric tally

Electric Lexus delivers impressive stats

Riley

Chris Riley has been a journalist for almost 40 years. He has spent half of his career as a writer, editor and production editor in newspapers, the rest of the time driving and writing about cars both in print and online. His love affair with cars began as a teenager with the purchase of an old VW Beetle, followed by another Beetle and a string of other cars on which he has wasted too much time and money. A self-confessed geek, he’s not afraid to ask the hard questions - at the risk of sounding silly.
5 1 vote
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
1 Comment
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Peter Evans
Peter Evans
13 days ago

Not surprised. Toyota build its first BEV more than 20 years ago , the eCom, before other companies even had an EV program. A two seater round town runabout which could be reserved/rented by credit card using the “Crayon” online booking system and were available at pick up and drop off/recharging points around Nagoya. Peter Overton of Channel 9 and I hired one and drove around Nagoya in 2003. The story ran on 60 Minutes that year. When the experiment was complete, Toyota donated them to the two or three SoCal universities, they supported, including UCD, for on campus use!