Mazda is officially in the electric car business with the launch of the MX-30.

What is the MX-30 I hear you ask? Well, it’s a compact crossover style coupe that comes in hybrid and pure electric form.

Based on the CX-30, it has the same length and width but sits a bit lower, is priced from from $33,990 and is due to go on sale here in the next few weeks.

The launch of the CX-30 also marks the return of the rear-facing, “suicide” doors that were such a defining feature of the discontinued RX-8 sports car — remember it?

The hybrid will be first cab off the rank, with three grades to choose from : Evolve, Touring and Astina — priced from $33,990, $36,490, and $40,990 — all before on road costs.

 

Mazda’s first ever hybrid is powered by a 2.0-litre, four-cylinder direct-injection ‘Skyactiv- G’ petrol engine, paired with Mazda’s M Hybrid mild hybrid system and a 6-speed auto.

Combined outputs are 114kW and 200Nm, while it uses a claimed 6.4L/100km on the combined cycle (NEDC).

Mazda says the e-Skyactiv G combines the virtues of Skyactiv G with the M Hybrid system to provide improved fuel efficiency, a smoother transition from idling stops and a more refined driving feel.

Energy is recovered during deceleration, improving efficiency and braking ability, while the system can shut down the petrol engine before the car comes to a complete stop, thanks to a new belt-driven integrated starter motor (ISG).

Not only does the ISG smooth the transition to an idling stop, it also aids re-start by assisting to spin the engine’s crankshaft.

The result is a reduction in noise and vibration.

The MX-30 Electric combines a 35.5kWh lithium-ion battery pack and a 107kW/271Nm electric motor, delivering a range of 224km from a single charge.

Given the average Aussie commute is a 32km round-trip, Mazda says the MX-30 will deliver fuss-free, silent driving over the course of a five-day working week – without the need to charge.

Ten airbags are included as standard: front, curtain, front-side, rear-side, front far-side (driver) and a driver’s knee airbag.

Standard equipment includes:

  • 18-inch silver alloy wheels
  • G-Vectoring Control Plus
  • Exterior mirrors with power adjustment and auto folding function
  • Auto on/off LED headlamps
  • Rear spoiler
  • Rain-sensing wipers
  • Advanced keyless push-button start
  • 8.8-inch widescreen colour display (Mazda Connect)
  • 7-inch TFT LCD multi-information meter display
  • Apple CarPlay and Android Auto
  • Eight-speaker audio system with DAB+ and Bluetooth audio
  • Satellite Navigation
  • Dual-zone climate control with touchscreen controls
  • Auto dimming interior rear-view mirror
  • Electric parking brake with Auto Hold function
  • Leather wrapped gear shifter
  • Leather wrapped steering wheel
  • Paddle shift gear control
  • Black and grey cloth seat upholstery
  • Rear seats with 60/40 split and centre fold-down armrest

 

The $1500 Vision Tech pack adds 360 degree View Monitor, Adaptive LED Headlights (ALH), Cruising & Traffic Support (CTS), Driver monitoring, Front Cross Traffic Alert (FCTA), and Smart Brake Support [Rear Crossing] (SBS-RC).

Two grey metallics are available across the range for $495 while the following three-tone colour schemes are available on the G20e Astina:

  • Ceramic Metallic with black roof and grey pillars – $995
  • Soul Red Crystal Metallic with black roof and grey pillars – $1490
  • Polymetal Grey Metallic with black roof and silver pillars – $1490

 

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Mazda powers up first ever hybrid

Riley

Chris Riley has been a journalist for almost 40 years. He has spent half of his career as a writer, editor and production editor in newspapers, the rest of the time driving and writing about cars both in print and online. His love affair with cars began as a teenager with the purchase of an old VW Beetle, followed by another Beetle and a string of other cars on which he has wasted too much time and money. A self-confessed geek, he’s not afraid to ask the hard questions - at the risk of sounding silly.
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