The future is looking good if Hyundai’s Prophecy concept car is anything to go on.

Rather than just a concept, the electric vehicle (EV) previews ideas and features that the Korean car maker will develop in the future, with the emphasis on will.

Prophecy, Hyundai says, is inspired by old time cars of the 1920s and 30s, with its smooth, coupe-like design.

You could also draw comparisons with the lines of the iconic Porsche 911, at least the hind quarters.

Sweeping curves and smooth lines set it apart from the angular 45, another Hyundai concept car that debuted last year.

A dynamic shape and rear spoiler convey a sporty appearance, while propeller-shaped wheels reduce air resistance.

The look is based on the design identity that Hyundai has dubbed Sensuous Sportiness.

Inside, the car exudes relaxation, with dark colours and natural materials that evoke nature.

It’s meant to create a completely new type of in-car experience.

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Hyundai Motor Group’s Chief Design Officer Luc Donckerwolke says ‘sportiness’ implies dynamics, to be reactive of what’s happening around us.

“Sensuous Sportiness is not about a new language or philosophy. It’s about a new concept in the creation of our cars,” he said.

One of Prophecy’s more unique characteristics is the steering mechanism.

Rather than a steering wheel, the car is controlled by dual joysticks, located left and right of the driver: one on the centre console and the other mounted on the door trim.

In combination with a spacious interior, it not only provides a more comfortable seating position, but also frees up space on the dashboard for other features.

In addition, 90 per cent of functions can be controlled via buttons on the joysticks, so there is no need for the driver to remove their hands to change the music.

This ergonomic setup is known as the Intuitive Human Interface and has the benefit of increasing passenger safety as well as visual freedom.

 

It’s not the only way the seating position is more ergonomic.

The new Smart Posture Care System (SPCS) allows drivers to enjoy an optimised seating position based on individual physical characteristics.

The driver can either adjust the seat manually, or allow the car to suggest a “smart” seating position for them.

In “smart” mode, the driver enters their height, seated height, and weight, and the car automatically adjusts to the driver’s specifications.

The SPCS controls the seat, steering wheel, mirror, and head-up display, and is based on medically-verified information.

The infotainment system is integrated into a large screen that stretches across the entire front of the vehicle’s interior.

When not driving, the car can be used as an entertainment space by switching to Relax Mode.

In this mode, the seats recline and the dashboard swivels upwards, creating the optimal seating position from which to enjoy content shown on the display.

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Without a steering wheel, there’s nothing to block the view.

Occupants see only the horizontal pillar-to-pillar display and the wing-shaped dashboard.

As autonomous driving technology progresses, Hyundai believes the potential for vehicles to be used as relaxation spaces will grow in importance.

Not only is Prophecy a zero-emissions electric vehicles – it actually cleans the air, thanks to a unique air filtration system.

When particle levels inside the vehicle get too high, the air system activates, taking in fresh air from the outside, filtering it for purity, and circulating the clean air throughout the vehicle.

The car continues to clean the air, even when it is idling or charging — even if no one is inside.

And, because the air is always fresh, the windows don’t wind down — they’re fixed units.

This system is significantly more energy efficient than a traditional ventilation system.

Prophecy is the second Hyundai vehicle to be built on the Electric Global Modular Platform or “E-GMP” – Hyundai’s first dedicated EV platform.

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Prophecy a portal to the future

Riley

Chris Riley has been a journalist for almost 40 years. He has spent half of his career as a writer, editor and production editor in newspapers, the rest of the time driving and writing about cars both in print and online. His love affair with cars began as a teenager with the purchase of an old VW Beetle, followed by another Beetle and a string of other cars on which he has wasted too much time and money. A self-confessed geek, he’s not afraid to ask the hard questions - at the risk of sounding silly.
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