X-TRAILWhat is it?

Nissan’s X-Trail has long been a success story is SUV land and there are lots of them running around all over the country.

But if you want one that’s somewhat different from the rest, you need to get in fast to secure an X-Trail N-Trek.

It’s a limited edition of only 500 units, based on the mid-spec ST-L grade.

X-TRAILWhat’s it cost?

You can get one in either two- or four-wheel drive, priced from $38,700.

It’s only a grand more than the standard ST-L and for the extra you get a fair amount of goods, such as larger 19-inch alloy wheels, a Bose 8-speaker audio system as well as an entire family of the brand’s genuine accessories.

 There’s a dark bonnet protector, slim line weathershields front and rear, front and rear kick plates and floor mats. 

I wasn’t crazy about the weathershield thingos.

They look fine and they serve a good purpose. in that you can leave the windows open to a small degree to let hot air escape on a sunny day — but they tend to distort vision to a small degree.

Mechanically there’s no difference.

Under the bonnet is a 126kW/226Nm 2.5-litre petrol four-pot engine and the vehicle comes with Nissan’s Intelligent Mobility pack.

You get a 360-degree view from above, Blind Spot Warning, Rear Cross Traffic Alert,  Emergency Braking and Forward Collision Warning, plus a good reversing camera.

There are also prominent N-Trek badges just to let owners of ordinary X-Trails know what they’re missing.

For dashboard fiddlers, there’s a 7.0-inch touchscreen display, Bluetooth audio streaming and hands-free phone system, digital radio and — if it’s a cold day — well, you can get some comfort from the heated front seats. 

Other items that appeal to most include leather-like seat trim, satellite navigation with traffic monitoring, cruise control and dual-zone climate control.

X-TRAIL

What’s it go like?

One negative, especially to advanced drivers who use left foot braking, is the location of what used to be the handbrake.

In Nissan-speak it’s a parking brake, and since a lot of Nissans are sold in the US — that’t what you get.

They’re called Rogues over there and those guys, Democrats and Republicans alike, buy about half a million of them every year.

And they’re fond of the foot-operated parking brake. 

So that’s why we also get the crazy system, apparently designed by a committee made up of tri-footed people.

Anyway, it’s not the end of the world, and most owners get used to it.

For the rest, it remains a practical and spacious medium-sized SUV vehicle with lots of room for passengers and cargo. 

It looks good, drives pretty well, has a tight turning circle, uses an average 8.4L/100km  and comes with a 5-year warranty.

X-TRAILWhat we like?

  • Appearance
  • Cameras, safety features
  • Economy
  • Smooth CVT
  • Long warranty

X-TRAIL

What we don’t like?

  • Parking brake
  • Front weathershields

X-TRAIL

The bottom line?

A popular, proven SUV with more pizzazz.

X-TRAIL

CHECKOUT: Nissan Navara N-Trek: Tarzan in a tuxedo

CHECKOUT: Nissan 370Z: Zed’ll stop ’em dead

 

Nissan X-Trail N-Trek, priced from $38,700
  • Looks - 7.5/10
    7.5/10
  • Performance - 7.5/10
    7.5/10
  • Safety - 8/10
    8/10
  • THirst - 8/10
    8/10
  • Practicality - 8/10
    8/10
  • Comfort - 8/10
    8/10
  • Tech - 8/10
    8/10
  • Value - 8/10
    8/10
7.9/10
Headshot Buys 96x96 - Nissan X-Trail N-Trek: More pizzazz

Buys

Bill Buys, probably Australia’s longest-serving motoring writer, has been at his craft for more than five decades. Athough motoring has always been in his DNA, he was also night crime reporter, foreign page editor and later chief reporter of the famed Rand Daily Mail. He’s twice been shot at, attacked by a rhinoceros and had several chilling experiences in aircraft. His experience includes stints in traffic law enforcement, motor racing and rallying and writing for a variety of local and international publications. He has covered countless events, ranging from world motor shows and Formula 1 Grands Prix to Targa tarmac and round-the-houses meetings. A motoring tragic, he has owned more than 90 cars. Somewhat of a nostalgic, he has a special interest in classic cars. He is the father of Targa star Robert Buys, who often adds his expertise to Bill’s reviews.
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