Mini’s new John Cooper Works GP edition is expected to be the fastest Mini yet.

Based on the Mini three-door and with a 225kW 2.0-litre turbocharged engine the GP does the dash from 0 to 100 km/h in just 5.2 seconds.

But Mini must be under-calling the numbers because the heavier, all-wheel drive JCW Clubman wagon with the same engine puts away the dash in an even more rapid 4.9 seconds.

The new Mini John Cooper Works GP is set to make its debut at the Los Angeles Auto Show on November 22.

Only 3000 units will be produced with deliveries set to get underway in March, 2020.

Mini says the exclusive character of the new Mini John Cooper Works GP, uncompromisingly geared towards extreme driving pleasure, is expressed in both its engine power and its performance characteristics.

More clearly than ever before, its standing is at the very forefront of the Mini and John Cooper Works model range.

As part of the development process, the Mini JCW GP completed a lap of the Nordschleife at Nürburgring in less than eight minutes – almost half a minute faster than its direct predecessor.

Mini says extensive modifications to the basic engine and to the Mini TwinPower Turbo Technology deliver a particularly spontaneous throttle response, as well as the continuous development of power high into the engine speed range.

The four cylinder engine develops its maximum torque of 450Nm at a low 1750 rpm, maintaining this torque up into the 4500 rev range.

Maximum power is available between 5000 and 6250 rpm.

Drive is to the front-wheels through a new 8-speed Steptronic transmission with mechanical differential lock.

Adapted motor racing technology is also used to transfer the engine’s outstanding drive power to the front wheels.

Thanks to the high elasticity of its engine, Mini claims it is capable of leaving higher-category sports cars behind on intermediate sprints.

No artificial limit has been imposed on the car which has a top speed is 265 km/h.

There’s just one colour — Racing Grey metallic — while the roof and exterior mirror caps are finished in contrasting Melting Silver metallic.

Just like the front apron, the rear apron with integrated rear fog lamps has a distinctive shaping.

A cross- member on the hexagonal radiator grille, the inserts in the lower air intake and the inside of the roof spoiler are finished in high-gloss Chilli Red.

Meanwhile the GP logos on the front and rear, the outer sides of the roof spoiler and the door sill finishers, as well as the foils above the side skirts, are finished with a stylised “GP” in Rosso Red metallic matt.

A striking contrast is provided by the black finish of the headlight surrounds, central radiator grille and rear lights, the fuel filler flap and door handles, as well as the inlay on the bonnet and the Mini logo at the front and rear of the vehicle.

The black inlays on the headlights and the maximally darkened Union Jack rear light units likewise emphasise the uncompromising sporty flair.

The new MINI John Cooper Works GP: an overview of the highlights

  • 2.0-litre 4-cylinder engine with MINI TwinPower Turbo Technology, 225kW and 450Nm
  • 55 kW more output than the MINI John Cooper Works
  • Acceleration from 0 to 100 km/h in 5.2 seconds, top speed: 265 km/h (not cut off)
  • Model-specific oil supply and cooling concept geared towards maximum performance
  • Model-specific sports exhaust system for emotionally powerful sound
  • 8-speed Steptronic sports transmission with integrated mechanical differential lock for the front wheels
  • Distinctive chassis design and set-up, suspension lowered by 10mm compared to the Mini John Cooper Works
  • Particularly high-performance sports brake system
  • Extremely rigid body structure, engine and suspension connection
  • Model-specific front and rear aprons
  • Roof spoiler with double-wing contour
  • Powerfully flared carbon wheel arch covers
  • Interior with two seats and model-specific cockpit

CHECKOUT: Mini upsizes Cooper with the Works

CHECKOUT: Yay! We’re getting the electric Mini

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Riley

Chris Riley has been a journalist for almost 40 years. He has spent half of his career as a writer, editor and production editor in newspapers, the rest of the time driving and writing about cars both in print and online. His love affair with cars began as a teenager with the purchase of an old VW Beetle, followed by another Beetle and a string of other cars on which he has wasted too much time and money. A self-confessed geek, he’s not afraid to ask the hard questions - at the risk of sounding silly.
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